celebrating 50 years of women developing nations abedmooc.com yunusmooc.com 1billiongirls.com
rsvp chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk to help with our survey of 30 women changing UN2.0, ed3.0, AIforgood, metaverse :Z Y X W V U T S R Q P o n M M2 l k k2 k3 j i h g f e d c c1 b a
In 2016, 9 education luminaries at UN HQ new york bravely stood up-goals can't be taught without a new map egov/Un2 connecting ed, tech, UN 50+ service networks eg food, health
Universal connectivity -what media needed 2020s: given since 1865 swiss partner ITU has been designing next tele-media as a worldwide cooperation br> what AIGood do we need given that somce 1920 einstein ,was early host of transnational intel cooperation then neumann devoted his 12 post war yeats to freeing AI and computing for humanity- so what do millennials need designed AIGood 2020s seeing next tech how do we need Digital to change
DCoop1 time of under 30s spent by education;
DCap2 time of over 30s spent by education
Given these system changes what maths goats of 2020s are neededso how does above change what perople need pubic sercants to do witth publi goods and trust/safety tpilie how does that impact inclusion and human rights

Wednesday, February 9, 2022

 Today a female prof from yale at OX Ethics Ins (with Schwarzman Scholars) asked about AI & participative democracy -it's not clear she included journalism or economists for humanity from adam smith on in her list of casses framed by PD jargon

Presenter: Professor Hélène Landemore

 

Title: Can AI help bridge the gap between quality deliberation and mass participation?

Abstract: One unsolved problem in democratic theory is how we can reconcile the twin goals of quality deliberation and mass participation. Both are arguably conditions for the full legitimacy of a democratic system. Quality deliberation, as a process through which laws and policies are generated, in theory promises good governance (output-legitimacy) as well as, at the very least, good reasons for the laws and policies put forward. Mass participation, by contrast, is a condition for the democratic input-legitimacy of the system, namely its capacity to take into account people’s needs and preferences. Unfortunately, thus far, it has proven impossible to reconcile those two goals as the quality of deliberation diminishes past a relatively low threshold of participants (a few hundreds, perhaps a few thousand people) and mass participation, on the other hand, is not conducive to the thoughtful, informed exchanges smaller numbers afford. In this presentation I explore the ways in which Artificial Intelligence may help bridge that gap, at least up to a point, using examples of relatively large-scale deliberative processes in France, Taiwan, and Chile.

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===================chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk writes teachforsdgs.com back in 1950 dad (norman) at the economist expereinced 2 scoops _ meeting von neumann he was advised always ask leaders what will they dpo with next decade's 100 times "moore" tech (comp and media)


british parliament had just ordered the british broadcasting corporation delay reporting of partiament by at least a week "because parliament is the supreme announcer or rules


by 1984 dad & my book 2025report debated why sustainability would depend on designing world web to be open and massive educational not vested to the laregst advertisers


I can ad ar least 50 other4 occasions when alumni of smith and of Economit founding mediator James Wislson contributed to today's OxYale

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